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The Gluten Free Veggie

Gluten Free and Vegetarian Recipes, Reviews and Information

Month

August 2017

Recipe (GF, Vegan) | Herb Wedges with a Lemon & Paprika Dip

This is a really easy dinner to make and far more delicious than the pre-made frozen versions (which often use a wheat flour coating anyway!).

This is a vegan and gluten free recipe using fresh homegrown herbs. If you don’t want to par-boil the wedges beforehand, just increase the oven cooking time by 15-20 minutes!

Ingredients:

1 large white potato, sliced into wedges of even size

1 handful of fresh thyme

1 handful of fresh rosemary

30g of vegan mayo

1 teaspoon of lemon juice

Smoked paprika to taste

Salt and pepper to taste

Sunflower oil

DSC03535

 

Method:

  1. Add the sliced potatoes to a steamer or pan of boiling water and cook for 5-10 minutes.
  2. Add the potatoes into an ovenproof dish with the oil and fresh herbs.
  3. Bake in the oven for 30-40 minutes on Gas Mark 7. For best results, cover with foil for the first 10 minutes.
  4. Remove each wedges from the oil and place onto a plate with paper towels on it to soak up the excess oil.
  5. In a bowl, mix the vegan mayo, paprika, lemon juice and salt and pepper. Add to a ramekin or dish (I used an egg cup!)

 

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Recipes every Monday, blog posts every Friday! See the previous Monday’s recipe here.

Social Media:

Youtube: The Gluten Free Veggie – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-b7T1VFTZqYq15aPvdlNwA

Twitter: @theGFveggie

Tumblr: glutenfreeveggie.tumblr.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theGFveggie

E-mail your questions or suggestions to: glutenfreeveggieblog@gmail.com

Advice | 8 Cheap GF & V Foods I Base my Diet on

Let me be clear about the term “diet” in the title – I mean my usual eating habits, not a “weight loss” or “fad” diet. These foods make up what I eat on a day to day basis and might help you with some inspiration for your own diet.

  1. Water water water water water!!!! No matter how obvious it might sound water is wonderful, especially if you are on a budget! A mistake lots of people make when trying to budget is to still drink fruit juice, squash, tea or alcohol with their meals or as their regular drink. Swapping even a few of your daily drinks to water will not only decrease sugar intake and improve hydration but also save you a lot of money in your weekly shop!
  2. Potatoes. The gluten free person’s best friend. They’re versatile and can be put with any flavours but most importantly they are naturally gluten free and CHEAP! We buy a big bag of cheap potatoes at the supermarket and make them last a few weeks. To maximise the amount of meals you can get out of a bag, make sure you store them in a dry, cool and dark place and in a bag made of cloth rather than plastic to prevent them from sprouting.
  3. Rice. Just like potatoes, rice is cheap and filling. A good tip is to sub it for gluten free pasta – it works just as well with pesto or vegetables but works out cheaper than most gluten free pastas.
  4. Bananas. I put them in everything – with cereal, in fruit salads, on toast. I even make a cheap pudding with a banana and nutella drizzled on top.
  5. Cheese!! Cheese is cheap and high in protein and calcium.
  6. Mushrooms. Mushrooms are a cheap substitute for the”meaty” texture in dishes such as lasagnes or burgers. They are very versatile and their taste can be tweaked to suit any cuisine. A tip for buying them cheaply is to buy them loose instead of in the packet. The savings may seem small but they add up over time and you won’t be contributing more plastic tubs to landfill!
  7. Carrots. Carrots are my go to vegetable if we’re low on money and I need something to bulk out a dish. Try them as part of this Vegan Shepherd’s Pie!
  8. Tomatoes. Tomatoes are very versatile for those on a budget because almost every form of them is very cheap! To save yourself money, don’t buy pre-made tomato sauces for pasta – buy a carton of passata (34p in ASDA) and add your own dried herbs or grow some herbs in your garden to save enough more money! Tomatoes are also very easy to to grow in your own garden in the summer and will cut your weekly shopping bill even more! Just make sure they are in a sunny part of the garden!

 

Which foods do you rely on when money is tight? Do you grow your own to save more money?

 

Recipe (GF, Vegan) | Evexia Penne & Homemade Pesto

This recipe includes a vegan pesto and homegrown yellow courgettes as well as Evexia Thrive’s Fresh Gluten Free Penne! For more recipes including Evexia Thrive’s products, see here.

 

Ingredients:

15g of basil

Olive oil, as needed

A small squeeze of lemon, or the zest if preferred

20g of sunflower seeds

Salt and pepper to taste

100g of Evexia Thrive Fresh Penne

A handful of plum tomatoes

A small yellow courgette, ribboned

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Method:

  1. Blitz the basil, sunflower seeds and lemon juice/zest in a blender, adding a small amount of olive oil until the consistency is creamy.
  2. Cook 100g of Evexia Thrive (4 mins) with the ribboned courgette.
  3. Chop the tomatoes. Strain the penne and add the pesto sauce and the chopped tomatoes.
  4. Serve with the ribbons on top for decoration.

DSC03394

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Recipes every Monday, blog posts every Friday! See the previous Monday’s recipe here.

Social Media:

Youtube: The Gluten Free Veggie – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-b7T1VFTZqYq15aPvdlNwA

Twitter: @theGFveggie

Tumblr: glutenfreeveggie.tumblr.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theGFveggie

E-mail your questions or suggestions to: glutenfreeveggieblog@gmail.com

Advice | 6 ways to survive being a Coeliac student

It can be one of the trickiest times for a Coeliac. I had to go gluten free in my second year of university and am now a postgraduate so I’ve had several years of practice! Here are some tips for those of you starting university next month.

  1. Get your SU on side. I worked hard to campaign for more gluten free food on my campus during my undergraduate degree and it really paid off (you can read more about that here). If you aren’t finding what you need in the SU shop or cafes on campus – talk to someone! I was lucky to find someone in the SU that also had a gluten intolerance and so my campaign was an easier battle but it was important to raise my voice and get better availability at the university.
  2. Talk to your roommates about it. If you’re in a shared house with a kitchen, politely explain to them the exact reasons why CC is so dangerous for you. If they mess with your food/contaminate your cooking equipment without apologising/double dip in the butter etc. you might need to get graphic with your explanations!
  3. Your freezer is your best friend! Gluten free food can be really expensive and so batch cooking and freezing is a really good way to save pennies! Make soup from scratch, stews, pasta dishes, shepherd’s pie – anything that you can batch cook and safely store in the freezer. I do this a lot with gluten free lasagne.
  4. If your health is effecting your uni work, talk to the lecturers. I had to file an extenuating circumstances form in my second year due to really bad IBS (this was pre-diagnosis with IBS) and it’s nothing to be ashamed of! If your teachers are aware of the situation they will be able to help you.
  5. Always have GF snacks in your bag/coat. You might find you get peckish whilst on campus and you’re a 20 minute walk from home with more classes later in the day. You cannot rely on the SU shop or cafes to always have safe food so it’s a good idea to have something like a GF cereal bar or packet of crisps in your bag or pockets just in case.
  6. Talk to your university friends about it. You will inevitably feel like you will never make friends when you’re a fresher – especially with everyone going out to eat or drink (mostly drink let’s be honest) and you can’t join in with take away pizza and beer. But you will find that you will make friends easily and it’s good to help them understand. My friends at uni were so accommodating – making me pizza I could eat for parties, changing the restaurant to somewhere safe etc.

Good luck to all Coeliac freshers starting September! You’re going to love it! Do you have any Coeliac student stories? Get in touch: glutenfreeveggieblog@gmail.com

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Recipes every Monday, blog posts every Friday! See the previous Monday’s recipe here.

Social Media:

Youtube: The Gluten Free Veggie – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-b7T1VFTZqYq15aPvdlNwA

Twitter: @theGFveggie

Tumblr: glutenfreeveggie.tumblr.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theGFveggie

E-mail your questions or suggestions to: glutenfreeveggieblog@gmail.com

Recipe (GF, V) | Raspberry and Nutella Cookies

Who can resist this mix of sweet nutella and tart raspberry? This recipe is two of my favourite flavours combined into easy to make, fast to cook biscuits! You will need to use your own judgement on whether to hand form these cookies or roll out the dough and use cutters – everyone does it their own way but I find gluten free dough easier to work with if you handle it as little as possible and just make flattened balls with your hands.

For other biscuit recipes, including vegan recipes, see here.

6.4.16 (3)

Ingredients:

150g of gluten free plain flour

40g of white sugar

70g of unsalted butter

3-4 tablespoons of Nutella (plus 2 extra for decoration if desired)

50g of raspberries (retain some for decoration)

4.8.17 (31)

 

Method:

  1. Add the raspberries to a saucepan and heat and stir until it forms a coulis. Strain the pips and leave to cool.
  2. Cream the butter and sugar together. Add the raspberry coulis and nutella and cream again until smooth.
  3. Add the flour and stir until it combines into a dough.
  4. Either hand form or roll out and cut the biscuits into shape. Place each biscuit onto a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper.
  5. Heat the nutella until runny and drizzle over the cookies to decorate. Finish with half a raspberry pressed into the top of each.
  6. Put into the oven for 15-20 minutes or until firm to the touch.
  7. Allow to cool and enjoy! Will keep in an air proof box for up to 5 days (use your own discretion).

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Recipes every Monday, blog posts every Friday! See the previous Monday’s recipe here.

Social Media:

Youtube: The Gluten Free Veggie – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-b7T1VFTZqYq15aPvdlNwA

Twitter: @theGFveggie

Tumblr: glutenfreeveggie.tumblr.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theGFveggie

E-mail your questions or suggestions to: glutenfreeveggieblog@gmail.com

 

Calling All Writers And Cooks!

Calling all writers and cooks! The Gluten Free Veggie is looking for a contributing author!
* Please note this is an unpaid position – I do not currently earn any money from my blog *
As some of you may know I am a postgraduate student and have a job as well as other responsibilities. I post twice a week on the blog and manage all of the social media accounts and behind the scenes running of a blog. I also create all of the content myself which means recipe testing, photography etc. This can take up a lot of time and so I’m looking for someone to write one blog post a month. My hope is this will add another facet to the blog whilst also freeing up a bit of my time.
Applicants will be interviewed over e-mail and will be asked to provide a sample piece and photographs. The successful applicant will be a competent writer and have the creativity necessary to think of new and engaging content each month! You must be able to adhere to the deadlines given and be organised enough to think ahead for future posts. Failure to meet deadlines will not be tolerated – I have worked hard to keep up the two posts a week so that my readership are aware of what to expect.
I will still be responsible for proof reading and uploading to the blog but there is a certain amount of freedom in terms of style and content.
All recipes MUST be gluten free AND vegetarian. This blog was created to fill that niche and appeal to individuals who are gluten free and vegetarian and so I will not compromise on this detail.
So what’s in it for you? The chance to show off your writing talent or cooking talen on a public platform without the hassle and stress of organising and running a blog. You also have the added bonus of writing for a blog that is established and has been building regular readers and followers for the past two years. Working to deadlines, sculpting your own blog posts and being creative are all transferable skills and I am happy for the successful applicant to add this to their CV. This would be ideal for a sixth former or university student with an interest in journalism (although, of course, this is open to anyone who is willing to commit!)
Whilst I can’t offer any pay you would have a chance to write for an online blog with a Facebook following of 650 people (which grows daily!) as well as hundreds of followers on other platforms such as WordPress, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr. We currently get around 100 views a day, with spikes of 700 on good days. With some more work I’m hoping to monetise The Gluten Free Veggie (but we’re a while off of that yet).
There is no limit to how long I will look for someone. I want to find someone who is right for the blog and will suit its style and I am in no rush.
Please e-mail glutenfreeveggieblog@gmail.com if you are interested and please share this post!

Awareness | A Guide to Free From Terminology

When you’re first diagnosed, all of the acronyms, scientific terms and Free From specific jargon can seem quite daunting. Well don’t despair – I’ve compiled as many terms, phrases and acronyms as I can to help you out!

 

GF – quite simply this is an acronym for “Gluten Free”. This one can become a little confusing as it is also used to mean “girlfriend” in non-Free From circles.

Coeliac Disease – an auto-immune disease that causes the body to attack the gut when gluten is ingested. Read more here.

Gluten intolerance – an intolerance that causes a reaction to gluten. People who suffer from a gluten intolerance do not have the long term gut damage associated with Coeliac Disease but still suffer bouts of illness after ingestion and can be effected by cross contamination. Those with a gluten intolerance may be able to tolerate small amounts of gluten. Little is known about why some people are intolerant to gluten.

Gluten sensitivity – similar to an intolerance to gluten, those with a gluten sensitivity can handle certain amounts of gluten without gut damage or illness. Again, little is known about what causes it.

DF – Dairy Free

EF – Egg Free

SF – is used to mean both “Soya Free” and sometimes “Sugar Free” so you may have to infer the meaning from context.

CC – Cross contamination. This is a term used to describe the act of cross contaminating Free From food. For example, a chef handles gluten bread and then handles gluten free bread. The trace amounts of gluten on the chef’s hands leads to the product being cross contaminated – i.e not safe for Coeliacs. You can read more about the effects and prevention of cross contamination here.

Under 20ppm – less than 20 parts per million. This is the term used in the legal discussions about gluten free food labelling. To legally be labelled as “Gluten Free” a company must prove that their food item contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten. Read more about this here.

DH – Dermatitis Herpetiformis. This is a skin condition associated with Coeliac Diesease. Not every Coeliac will also suffer from DH. Read more here.

NGCI – no gluten containing ingredients. Read more about that here.

IBS – Irritable Bowel Syndrome. I have lots of blog posts about this, you can browse them here.

Low FODMAP – A diet created with the aim of helping those that suffer from IBS. Read more about it here.

Glutened – this is a term used by those with Coeliac Disease or gluten intolerance when they have accidentally ingested gluten.

Made in a factory that handles… – this is as simple as what it says. This is a warning that companies place on their products to show that the product has been made in a factory that uses a specific allergen in other products. There is no general consensus on this issue in the gluten free community – in fact, it seems split right down the middle with some people happy to eat them and some people not! Do your research and make your own mind up about whether you think it is safe.

May contain… – this is similar to the phrase above. Labelling a product with “may contain” is completely voluntary. It indicates that the product has been made in a factory that uses the allergen, and potentially that the same line is used. This label is a little ambiguous, and again the free from community seems quite divided on the issue of “to eat or not to eat”. Read more here.

 

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